• San Rocco #3: Mistakes
  • San Rocco #3: Mistakes
  • San Rocco #3: Mistakes
  • San Rocco #3: Mistakes
  • San Rocco #3: Mistakes

San Rocco #3: Mistakes

Matteo Ghidoni (Ed.)

There is plenty of bad architecture all over the place. Stupid, wrong architecture. Architecture that failed, and failed miserably. Architecture that is full of mistakes. (English)

But San Rocco 3 does not talk about that. San Rocco 3 is interested in another kind of mistake: mistakes that are the product of a disproportion, of a displacement; mistakes that are somehow generous, open, brave; mistakes that involve some sort of heroic failure; mistakes that shed a new light on the limits of the very same rule that labels them as mistakes.

San Rocco 3 is interested in mistakes and in the grammar of architectural mistakes.

San Rocco was the product of the collaboration of two young architects. San Rocco did not contribute to the later fame of its two designers. The purity and radicalism of the design does not involve any intolerance. San Rocco suggests an entirely new set of possibilities. It seems to be the beginning of a new type of architecture, or the first application of a new type of architecture, or the first application of a new – and happy – design method that has not been developed further.

San Rocco proposes the possibility of reusing architectural traditions that lie outside of private memory (contrary to Rossi’s usual approach) without erasing personal contributions (contrary to Grassi’s usual approach). In San Rocco, common does not mean dry, and personal does not mean egomaniacal. San Rocco seems to suggest the possibility of an architecture that is both open and personal, both monumental and fragile, both rational and questioning.

San Rocco is interested in gathering together the widest possible variety of contributions. San Rocco believes that architecture is a collective knowledge, and that collective knowledge is the product of a multitude. External contributions to  San Rocco might take different forms. Essays, illustrations, designs, comic strips and even novels are all equally suitable for publication in San Rocco.

In principle, there are no limits – either minimum or maximum – imposed on the length of contributions. Minor contributions (a few lines of text, a small drawing, a photo, a postcard) are by no means uninteresting to San Rocco. For each issue, San Rocco will put out a “call for papers” comprised of an editorial note and of a list of cases, each followed by a short comment. As such, the “call for papers” is a preview of the magazine. The “call for papers” defines the field of interest of a given issue and produces a context in which to situate contributions.

To sum up:

San Rocco is a magazine about architecture.

San Rocco does not solve problems.

San Rocco is written by architects.

In San Rocco pictures are more important than texts.

San Rocco is the name of a place in Monza. Giorgio Grassi and Aldo Rossi engaged in a design competition for this place in 1971. He project was not build; ordinary housing blocks were built instead.

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